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Psychology

Seeing is believing

Nature Climate Change volume 3, pages 312313 (2013) | Download Citation

Or do we see something, because we believe it? Evidence suggests that personal experience is more likely to influence Americans with no strong beliefs about climate change than those with firm beliefs.

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Author information

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  1. Elke U. Weber is at Columbia University, 3022 Broadway, 716 Uris Hall, New York 10027, USA

    • Elke U. Weber

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Correspondence to Elke U. Weber.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1859

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