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Psychology

Fear and hope in climate messages

Nature Climate Change volume 2, pages 572573 (2012) | Download Citation

Scientists often expect fear of climate change and its impacts to motivate public support of climate policies. A study suggests that climate change deniers don't respond to this, but that positive appeals can change their views.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Paul C. Stern is at the National Research Council at the National Academy of Sciences, 500 Fifth Street NW, Washington DC, USA and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Edward Bulls veg 1, 7491 Trondheim, Norway

    • Paul C. Stern

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Correspondence to Paul C. Stern.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1610

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