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Sociology

The growing climate divide

Nature Climate Change volume 1, pages 195196 (2011) | Download Citation

Climate change has reached the level of a 'scientific consensus', but is not yet a 'social consensus'. New analysis highlights that a growing divide between liberals and conservatives in the American public is a major obstacle to achieving this end.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Andrew J. Hoffman is the Holcim (US) Professor of Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan, with joint appointments in the Stephen M. Ross School of Business and the School of Natural Resources and Environment, 701 Tappan Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA

    • Andrew J. Hoffman

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Correspondence to Andrew J. Hoffman.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1144

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