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Sugars synthesized in a snap

The chemical synthesis of natural oligosaccharides by sequentially stitching monosaccharides together remains a major challenge because of the complexity of carbohydrate structures. A recent paper reports a versatile technology for creating selectively protected synthetic intermediates, thus providing easy access to complex oligosaccharides.

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Figure 1: Strategies for selective protection of glucose hydroxyls with different protecting groups.

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Wang, P. Sugars synthesized in a snap. Nat Chem Biol 3, 309–310 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1038/nchembio0607-309

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