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Biomaterials

Redox and adhesion on the rocks

Nature Chemical Biology volume 7, pages 579580 (2011) | Download Citation

Man-made adhesives cannot match the ability of a marine mussel to affix itself to a wet rock. New insights help to describe the protein-surface bonding central to this feat of biological materials engineering.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Jonathan J. Wilker is in the Department of Chemistry and School of Materials Engineering at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA.

    • Jonathan J Wilker

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Competing interests

The author declares no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Jonathan J Wilker.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchembio.639

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