News & Views | Published:

Metabolite imaging

Knock, Nox—ROS there?

Nature Chemical Biology volume 7, pages 7172 (2011) | Download Citation

The development of small-molecule probes for use in neural stem cells demonstrates the importance of endogenous ROS signaling in regulating in vivo phenotypes.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    Physiol. Rev. 82, 47–95 (2002).

  2. 2.

    et al. Nat. Chem. Biol. 7, 106–112 (2011)

  3. 3.

    Nat. Rev. Immunol. 4, 181–189 (2004).

  4. 4.

    & ACS Chem. Biol. 5, 47–62 (2010).

  5. 5.

    & Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 2481–2504 (2009).

  6. 6.

    et al. Mol. Cell. Biol. 26, 5908–5920 (2006).

  7. 7.

    & Curr. Opin. Chem. Biol. 11, 620–625 (2007).

  8. 8.

    , , & Nat. Neurosci. 11, 888–893 (2008).

  9. 9.

    & Curr. Opin. Chem. Biol. published online 3 December 2010, 10.1016/j.cbpa.2010.11.012.

  10. 10.

    & Sci. Signal. 2, re7 (2009).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Kate S. Carroll is in the Chemistry Department, The Scripps Research Institute, Jupiter, Florida, USA.

    • Kate S Carroll

Authors

  1. Search for Kate S Carroll in:

Competing interests

The author declares no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Kate S Carroll.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchembio.515

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing