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Antibiotics

Inactive but not inert

Nature Chemical Biology volume 6, pages 8586 (2010) | Download Citation

Antibiotics can break down through the action of enzymes or through non-enzymatic processes. In the case of tetracycline, this drug 'debris' can have unexpected biological activities, including selection against resistance.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Gerard D. Wright is at the M.G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research, Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

    • Gerard D Wright

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Correspondence to Gerard D Wright.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchembio.299

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