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The physical chemistry of membrane curvature

Nature Chemical Biology volume 5, pages 783784 (2009) | Download Citation

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Membrane curvature sensing by amphipathic helices is an emergent property of the ensemble of molecules and membrane sites. New data suggest that individual molecules do not experience stronger binding to curved membranes.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Jay T. Groves is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator in the Department of Chemistry, University of California Berkeley, and the Physical Bioscience and Materials Sciences Divisions, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA.

    • Jay T Groves

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Correspondence to Jay T Groves.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchembio.247

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