Perspective | Published:

Insights into newly discovered marks and readers of epigenetic information

Nature Chemical Biology volume 12, pages 662668 (2016) | Download Citation

Abstract

The field of chromatin biology has been advancing at an accelerated pace. Recent discoveries of previously uncharacterized sites and types of post-translational modifications (PTMs) and the identification of new sets of proteins responsible for the deposition, removal, and reading of these marks continue raising the complexity of an already exceedingly complicated biological phenomenon. In this Perspective article we examine the biological importance of new types and sites of histone PTMs and summarize the molecular mechanisms of chromatin engagement by newly discovered epigenetic readers. We also highlight the imperative role of structural insights in understanding PTM–reader interactions and discuss future directions to enhance the knowledge of PTM readout.

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Acknowledgements

Research in T.G.K.'s laboratory is supported by US National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants GM101664, GM106416, and GM100907. B.D.S. is supported by grants from the NIH and the US National Science Foundation (GM110058 and MCB1330320). F.H.A. was supported by NIH grant T32AA007464 and an AHA postdoctoral fellowship.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

    • Forest H Andrews
    •  & Tatiana G Kutateladze
  2. Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

    • Brian D Strahl

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Tatiana G Kutateladze.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchembio.2149

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