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Molecular machines

Springing into action

Nature Chemistry volume 2, pages 429430 (2010) | Download Citation

Controlling the movements of molecular systems through external stimuli is crucial for the construction of nanoscale mechanical machines. A spring-like compound has now been prepared — a double helicate that retains its handedness under ion-triggered extension and contraction.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Ben L. Feringa is at the Centre for Systems Chemistry, Stratingh Institute for Chemistry and Zernike Insitute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG, Groningen, The Netherlands.  b.l.feringa@rug.nl

    • Ben L. Feringa

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.676

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