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C–H activation

Complex peptides made simple

Nature Chemistry volume 9, pages 910 (2017) | Download Citation

Nature oxidizes biosynthetic intermediates into structurally and functionally diverse peptides. An iron-catalysed C–H oxidation mimics this approach in the lab, enabling chemists to synthesize structural analogues with ease.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Sean Bartlett and David R. Spring are in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW, UK

    • Sean Bartlett
    •  & David R. Spring

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to David R. Spring.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.2701

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