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Carbon materials

MOF morphologies in control

Nature Chemistry volume 8, pages 638639 (2016) | Download Citation

The calcination of metal–organic framework (MOF) precursors is promising for the preparation of nanoscale carbon materials, but the resulting morphologies have remained limited. Now, controlling the growth of precursor MOFs has enabled 1D carbon nanorods to be fabricated — these can then be readily unravelled into 2D graphene nanoribbons.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Jing Tang and Yusuke Yamauchi are in the World Premier International (WPI) Research Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan

    • Jing Tang
    •  & Yusuke Yamauchi
  2. Y.Y. is also in the Australian Institute for Innovative Materials (AIIM), University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, New South Wales 2500, Australia

    • Yusuke Yamauchi

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Correspondence to Yusuke Yamauchi.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.2548

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