Thesis | Published:

Carbon-based curiosities

Nature Chemistry volume 1, pages 170171 (2009) | Download Citation

Subjects

Diamonds may be forever, but are some other forms of carbon merely passing fads? Stuart Cantrill considers why carbon often seems to be a chemist's best friend.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    , , , & Nature 318, 162–163 (1985).

  2. 2.

    The Most Beautiful Molecule (Wiley, 1995).

  3. 3.

    & Carbon 44, 1621–1623 (2006).

  4. 4.

    Nature 354, 56–58 (1991).

  5. 5.

    et al. Science 306, 666–669 (2004).

  6. 6.

    & Nature Mater. 6, 183–191 (2007).

  7. 7.

    & Nature Nanotech. 4, 217–224 (2009).

  8. 8.

    et al. Nature 458, 872–876 (2009).

  9. 9.

    , , , & Nature 458, 877–880 (2009).

  10. 10.

    , & Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 47, 1022–1036 (2007).

  11. 11.

    et al. Science 316, 1460–1462 (2007).

  12. 12.

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Stuart Cantrill is the Chief Editor of Nature Chemistry, and promises not to make a habit of writing Thesis columns.

    • Stuart Cantrill

Authors

  1. Search for Stuart Cantrill in:

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.219

Further reading

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing