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Bioelectronics

A positive future for squid proteins

Nature Chemistry volume 6, pages 563564 (2014) | Download Citation

Protein-based protonic conductivity plays an important role in nature, but has been explored little outside of a biological setting. Now, proton conductors have been developed based on the squid protein reflectin, and integrated with devices for potential bioelectronic applications.

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Affiliations

  1. Marco Rolandi is in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2120, USA

    • Marco Rolandi

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Correspondence to Marco Rolandi.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.1980

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