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Chemical biology

Knockout for malaria

Nature Chemistry volume 6, pages 9394 (2014) | Download Citation

Discovering and validating new targets is urgently required to tackle the rise in resistance to antimalarial drugs. Now, inhibition of the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase has been shown to prevent the formation of a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite that causes malaria, leading to death of the parasite.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Joanna Krysiak and Stephan A. Sieber are in the Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Munich, D-85747 Garching, Germany

    • Joanna Krysiak
    •  & Stephan A. Sieber

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Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Joanna Krysiak or Stephan A. Sieber.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.1854

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