Review Article | Published:

The chemistry of two-dimensional layered transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets

Nature Chemistry volume 5, pages 263275 (2013) | Download Citation

Abstract

Ultrathin two-dimensional nanosheets of layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are fundamentally and technologically intriguing. In contrast to the graphene sheet, they are chemically versatile. Mono- or few-layered TMDs — obtained either through exfoliation of bulk materials or bottom-up syntheses — are direct-gap semiconductors whose bandgap energy, as well as carrier type (n- or p-type), varies between compounds depending on their composition, structure and dimensionality. In this Review, we describe how the tunable electronic structure of TMDs makes them attractive for a variety of applications. They have been investigated as chemically active electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution and hydrosulfurization, as well as electrically active materials in opto-electronics. Their morphologies and properties are also useful for energy storage applications such as electrodes for Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors.

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Acknowledgements

M.C. acknowledges support from the National Science Foundation IGERT programme (DGE 0903661). H.Z. acknowledges support from the Singapore National Research Foundation under the CREATE programme: 'Nanomaterials for Energy and Water Management', and NTU under the Start-Up Grant M4080865.070.706022. H.S.S. acknowledges support from WCU (World Class University) programme (R31-2008-000-20012-0) and the grant (Code No. 2011-0031630) from the Center for Advanced Soft Electronics under the Global Frontier Research Program through the National Research Foundation funded by MEST of Korea. G.E. acknowledges the Singapore National Research Foundation for NRF Research Fellowship (NRF-NRFF2011-02). L.L. acknowledges support from Academia Sinica Taiwan. We acknowledge Jieun Yang for editorial help and TOC artwork. K.P.L. acknowledges the NRF-CRP award 'Novel 2D materials with tailored properties: beyond graphene' (R-144-000-295-281).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA

    • Manish Chhowalla
  2. Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy and Low Dimensional Carbon Materials Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), UNIST-gil 50, Ulsan 689-798, Republic of Korea

    • Hyeon Suk Shin
  3. Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542

    • Goki Eda
  4. Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543

    • Goki Eda
    •  & Kian Ping Loh
  5. Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117546

    • Goki Eda
    •  & Kian Ping Loh
  6. Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan

    • Lain-Jong Li
  7. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798

    • Hua Zhang

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Manish Chhowalla.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.1589

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