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Single-chain technology using discrete synthetic macromolecules

Nature Chemistry volume 3, pages 917924 (2011) | Download Citation

Abstract

Fundamental polymer science is undergoing a profound transformation. As a result of recent progress in macromolecular chemistry and physics, synthetic polymer chains are becoming much more than just the modest building blocks of traditional 'plastics'. Promising options for controlling the primary and secondary structures of synthetic polymers have been proposed and, therefore, similarly to biopolymers, synthetic macromolecules may now be exploited as discrete objects with carefully engineered structures and functions. Although it is not possible today to reach the high level of complexity found in biomaterials, these new chemical possibilities open interesting avenues for applications in microelectronics, photovoltaics, catalysis and biotechnology. Here, we describe in detail these recent advances in macromolecular science and emphasize the possible emergence of technologies based on single-chain devices.

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Acknowledgements

J.-F.L. thanks the CNRS, the University of Strasbourg, the International Center for Frontier Research in Chemistry (FRC, Strasbourg) and the European Research Council (Project SEQUENCES – ERC grant agreement no. 258593) for financial support. M.S. and M.O. thank the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan, for financial support through a Grant-in-Aid for Creative Science Research (18GS0209).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Polymer Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510, Japan

    • Makoto Ouchi
    •  & Mitsuo Sawamoto
  2. Precision Macromolecular Chemistry Group, Institut Charles Sadron, UPR22-CNRS, 23 rue du Loess, BP 84047, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2, France

    • Nezha Badi
    •  & Jean-François Lutz

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Jean-François Lutz or Mitsuo Sawamoto.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.1175

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