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A caspase-independent way to kill cancer cells

Nature Cell Biology volume 19, pages 10141015 (2017) | Download Citation

Cancer treatments often focus on killing tumour cells through apoptosis, which is thought to typically require mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) and subsequent caspase activation. A study now shows that MOMP can trigger TNF-dependent, but caspase-independent cell death, suggesting a different approach to improve cancer therapy.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Brent E. Fitzwalter and Andrew Thorburn are in the Department of Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA

    • Brent E. Fitzwalter
    •  & Andrew Thorburn

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Andrew Thorburn.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ncb3604

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