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Metabolic regulation of stem cell function in tissue homeostasis and organismal ageing

Abstract

Many tissues and organ systems in metazoans have the intrinsic capacity to regenerate, which is driven and maintained largely by tissue-resident somatic stem cell populations. Ageing is accompanied by a deregulation of stem cell function and a decline in regenerative capacity, often resulting in degenerative diseases. The identification of strategies to maintain stem cell function and regulation is therefore a promising avenue to allay a wide range of age-related diseases. Studies in various organisms have revealed a central role for metabolic pathways in the regulation of stem cell function. Ageing is associated with extensive metabolic changes, and interventions that influence cellular metabolism have long been recognized as robust lifespan-extending measures. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the metabolic control of stem cell function, and how stem cell metabolism relates to homeostasis and ageing.

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Figure 1: Metabolic regulation of stem cell pluripotency and quiescence.
Figure 2: Redox regulation of stem cell function.
Figure 3: Mitochondrial dysfunction and stem cell ageing.

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Acknowledgements

N.S.C. is supported by NIH HL122062, AG049665 and HL071643; H.J. by NIH AG028127, GM100196, AG047497 and EY018177; T.T.H. by an AHA Predoctoral Fellowship; and E.P. by an LLS Scholar Award, PBBR and Glenn Foundation Research Awards, and NIH HL111266, HL092471 and CA184014.

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Correspondence to Emmanuelle Passegué.

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Chandel, N., Jasper, H., Ho, T. et al. Metabolic regulation of stem cell function in tissue homeostasis and organismal ageing. Nat Cell Biol 18, 823–832 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/ncb3385

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