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A role for CSLD3 during cell-wall synthesis in apical plasma membranes of tip-growing root-hair cells

Nature Cell Biology volume 13, pages 973980 (2011) | Download Citation

Abstract

In plants, cell shape is defined by the cell wall, and changes in cell shape and size are dictated by modification of existing cell walls and deposition of newly synthesized cell-wall material1. In root hairs, expansion occurs by a process called tip growth, which is shared by root hairs, pollen tubes and fungal hyphae1. We show that cellulose-like polysaccharides are present in root-hair tips, and de novo synthesis of these polysaccharides is required for tip growth. We also find that eYFP–CSLD3 proteins, but not CESA cellulose synthases, localize to a polarized plasma-membrane domain in root hairs. Using biochemical methods and genetic complementation of a csld3 mutant with a chimaeric CSLD3 protein containing a CESA6 catalytic domain, we provide evidence that CSLD3 represents a distinct (1→4)-β-glucan synthase activity in apical plasma membranes during tip growth in root-hair cells.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank C. Somerville and H. Hofte for sharing eYFP–CESA6- and eGFP–CESA3-transformed lines, C. Collins for providing access to the spinning-disc confocal microscope and O. Shafer for access to the Olympus Fluoview confocal microscope. We would also like to thank S. Clark, S. DeBolt, A. Liepman and J. Schiefelbein for discussions. This work was supported by grants from the Department of Energy, DE-FG02-07ER15887 (E.N.), and the National Science Foundation, 0937323 (E.N.).

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA

    • Sungjin Park
    • , Amy L. Szumlanski
    • , Fangwei Gu
    • , Feng Guo
    •  & Erik Nielsen

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Contributions

S.P. carried out most experiments. A.L.S., F. Gu, F. Guo and E.N. all contributed to experimental work and data analysis in this manuscript. E.N. was also responsible for project planning.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Erik Nielsen.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ncb2294

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