News & Views | Published:

The hand that rocks the spindle

Nature Cell Biology volume 7, pages 858859 (2005) | Download Citation

Subjects

Asymmetric cell division is a fundamental process by which cells give rise to progenies with different fates. Although this mechanism is well studied in the worm and fly, mammalian asymmetric cell division is poorly understood. The finding that Gβγ and AGS3 can control mitotic spindle orientation and progenitor cell fates during mouse cortical development suggests evolutionarily conserved roles in asymmetric cell division.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    & Annu. Rev. Genet. 37, 221–249 (2003).

  2. 2.

    & Curr. Biol. 14, R674–R685 (2004).

  3. 3.

    , & Cell 76, 477–491 (1994).

  4. 4.

    , , , & Neuron 17, 43–53 (1996).

  5. 5.

    , , & Development 129, 4843–4853 (2002).

  6. 6.

    , , , & Nature 419, 929–934 (2002).

  7. 7.

    et al. Neuron 40, 1105–1118 (2003).

  8. 8.

    & Cell 122, 119–131 (2005).

  9. 9.

    & Cell 119, 453–456 (2004).

  10. 10.

    , , , & J. Biol. Chem. 269, 6193–6197 (1994).

  11. 11.

    & Cell 82, 631–641 (1995).

  12. 12.

    , & Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 100, 2890–2895 (2003).

  13. 13.

    , , & Nature Neurosci. 7, 136–144 (2004).

  14. 14.

    et al. EMBO J. 23, 2314–2324 (2004).

  15. 15.

    & Development 132, 3327–3332 (2005).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Chay T. Kuo and Yuh-Nung Jan are at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, 1550 4th Street, Room GD484E, San Francisco, CA 94143-0725, USA. ynjan@itsa.ucsf.edu

    • Chay T. Kuo
    •  & Yuh-Nung Jan

Authors

  1. Search for Chay T. Kuo in:

  2. Search for Yuh-Nung Jan in:

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ncb0905-858

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing