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Cadmium blocks viral invasion in plants

Nature Cell Biology volume 4, pages E167E168 (2002) | Download Citation

Subjects

To move between different parts of their hosts, most plant viruses exploit the phloem. Plants exposed to subtoxic levels of cadmium ions can resist this viral highjacking of their transportation network. New work in this issue of Nature Cell Biology has identified a novel, chemically induced, glycine-rich protein that is responsible for inhibiting the long-distance movement of turnip vein clearing tobamovirus (TVCV) in tobacco plants.

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Affiliations

  1. John P. Carr and Alex M. Murphy are in the Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK. john.carr@plantsci.cam.ac.uk

    • John P. Carr
    •  & Alex M. Murphy

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ncb0702-e167

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