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The transcriptional and signalling networks of pluripotency

Abstract

Pluripotency and self-renewal are the hallmarks of embryonic stem cells. This state is maintained by a network of transcription factors and is influenced by specific signalling pathways. Current evidence indicates that multiple pluripotent states can exist in vitro. Here we review the recent advances in studying the transcriptional regulatory networks that define pluripotency, and elaborate on how manipulation of signalling pathways can modulate pluripotent states to varying degrees.

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Figure 1: Crosstalk between transcriptional regulatory networks, epigenetic and non-coding RNA networks.
Figure 2: Interconversion of pluripotent states for mouse and human cells.

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Acknowledgements

We thank A. Hutchins, D. Heng and J-H. Ng for critical comments on the manuscript.

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Ng, HH., Surani, M. The transcriptional and signalling networks of pluripotency. Nat Cell Biol 13, 490–496 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1038/ncb0511-490

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