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Cilia put a brake on Wnt signalling

Nature Cell Biology volume 10, pages 1113 (2008) | Download Citation

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Two studies suggest that the primary cilium, a microtubule-based structure protruding from the surface of most vertebrate cells, has a role in restraining Wnt/β-catenin signalling. These findings have implications for the pathogenesis of a plethora of diseases associated with abnormal cilia; however, the mechanism linking Wnt signalling and cilia remains a mystery.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Xi He is at the F. M. Kirby Neurobiology Center, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Enders 461.2, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.  xi.he@childrens.harvard.edu

    • Xi He

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ncb0108-11

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