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Should moral objections to synthetic biology affect public policy?

Nature Biotechnology volume 27, pages 11061108 (2009) | Download Citation

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Moral concerns as to the relationship of synthetic biology with nature do not provide a convincing basis for more stringent regulatory oversight of the field.

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Acknowledgements

This work was funded by grants from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and from the US National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Affiliations

  1. Gregory E. Kaebnick is at The Hastings Center, Garrison, New York, USA.

    • Gregory E Kaebnick

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Correspondence to Gregory E Kaebnick.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nbt1209-1106

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