Research Article | Published:

A microfabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorter

Nature Biotechnology volume 17, pages 11091111 (1999) | Download Citation

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Abstract

We have demonstrated a disposable microfabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorter (μFACS) for sorting various biological entities. Compared with conventional FACS machines, the μFACS provides higher sensitivity, no cross-contamination, and lower cost. We have used μFACS chips to obtain substantial enrichment of micron-sized fluorescent bead populations of differing colors. Furthermore, we have separated Escherichia coli cells expressing green fluorescent protein from a background of nonfluorescent E. coli cells and shown that the bacteria are viable after extraction from the sorting device. These sorters can function as stand-alone devices or as components of an integrated microanalytical chip.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by the Army Research Office and the National Science Foundation. We especially thank Hou-Pu Chou for fabrication of the silicon molds.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125.

    • Anne Y. Fu
    • , Charles Spence
    • , Axel Scherer
    •  & Stephen R. Quake
  2. Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 .

    • Anne Y. Fu
    •  & Frances H. Arnold

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Correspondence to Stephen R. Quake.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/15095

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