Research Article | Published:

Seminal vesicle production and secretion of growth hormone into seminal fluid

Nature Biotechnology volume 17, pages 10871090 (1999) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Production of foreign proteins in the tissues of transgenic animals represents an efficient and economical method of producing therapeutic and pharmaceutical proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that the mouse P12 gene promoter specific to the male accessory sex gland can be used to generate transgenic mice that express human growth hormone (hGH) in their seminal vesicle epithelium. The hGH is secreted into the ejaculated seminal fluids with the seminal vesicle lumen contents containing concentrations of up to 0.5 mg/ml. As semen is a body fluid that can be collected easily on a continuous basis, the production of transgenic animals expressing pharmaceutical proteins into their seminal fluid could prove to be a viable alternative to use of the mammary gland as a bioreactor.

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Acknowledgements

This research was supported by a grant from the Société Innovatech, Québec et Chaudière Appalaches, Québec, Canada.

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Affiliations

  1. Centre de la Recherche en Biologie de la Reproduction, Département des Sciences Animales, Pavillon Paul-Comtois, Université Laval, Ste-Foy, Québec, Canada.

    • Michael K. Dyck
    • , Dominic Gagné
    • , Mariette Ouellet
    • , Jean-François Sénéchal
    • , Edith Bélanger
    • , Dan Lacroix
    • , Marc-André Sirard
    •  & François Pothier

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Correspondence to François Pothier.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/15067

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