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Patenting plants: What to claim

Abstract

Market competition and a recent agbiotech case highlight the importance of deciding what is patentable subject matter.

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References

  1. See, for example, US Patent Nos. 5,843,782; 5,436,395; 5,066,830.

  2. See, for example, US Patent No. 5,844,118.

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  4. For review, see Moffatt, A.S. Science 282, 2176– 2178 (1998) and Holzman, D. Gen. Eng. News 2/15, 1, 8 & 35 (1999).

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  11. 35 USC 101 states that any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, composition of matter invented or discovered is patentable.

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  17. The full text and commentary can be downloaded from http://wuesthoff.de/c.htm.

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  1. Cheryl H. Agris is a patent attorney based in , and is special counsel to

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    Agris, C. Patenting plants: What to claim. Nat Biotechnol 17, 717–718 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1038/10938

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