A synthetic DNA transplant

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The complete set of tools needed to synthesize a functional genome and transplant it into a mycoplasma cell opens up the possibility of mixing and matching natural and synthetic DNA to make genomes with new capabilities.

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Figure 1: Simplified protocol used to produce Mycoplasma mycoides JCVI-syn1.0 using a chassis derived from M. capricolum and a 1.08 Mbp variant of the M. mycoides genome designed to carry distinguishable 'watermark' sequences.

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Correspondence to Mitsuhiro Itaya.

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