Antisense starts making more sense

Numerous endogenous antisense RNAs suggest antisense regulation of the human genome is more widespread than first thought.

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Figure 1: Two fates for dsRNA in the nucleus.

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Carmichael, G. Antisense starts making more sense. Nat Biotechnol 21, 371–372 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1038/nbt0403-371

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