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Induction of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes by artificial antigen-presenting cells

Nature Biotechnology volume 18, pages 405409 (2000) | Download Citation

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Abstract

The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is a promising therapeutic approach for a number of diseases. To overcome the difficulty in generating specific CTLs, we established stable artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) that can be used to stimulate T cells of any patient of a given human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type. Mouse fibroblasts were retrovirally transduced with a single HLA–peptide complex along with the human accessory molecules B7.1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3. These AAPCs consistently elicit strong stimulation and expansion of HLA-restricted CTLs. Owing to the high efficiency of retrovirus-mediated gene transfer, stable AAPCs can be readily engineered for any HLA molecule and any specific peptide.

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Acknowledgements

We thank C. Tan (Gene Transfer and Somatic Cell Engineering Facility, MSKCC) for excellent technical assistance, T. Delohery (Flow Cytometry Core Facility, MSKCC) for excellent assistance with cell sorting, and Dr. I. Rivière for reviewing the manuscript. This work was supported by grant CA-59350, the Dewitt Wallace Fund, and the McDonnell Scholars Award for Molecular Medicine (M.S.).

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  1. Department of Human Genetics Immunology Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021.

    • Jean-Baptiste Latouche
    •  & Michel Sadelain

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Correspondence to Michel Sadelain.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/74455

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