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Microbial Enhancement of Oil Recovery

Bio/Technology volume 1, pages 4754 (1983) | Download Citation

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Microorganisms and microbial products can be used to recover oil from reservoirs. To be successful, the complexity of oil and the physical constraints in the reservoir must be taken into account. The three general approaches are: stimulation of the endogenous microbial population; injection of microorganisms with proven ability to perform well in situ; and the use of microbial products, such as xanthan gum, produced by Xanthomonas campestris.

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  1. Department of Microbiology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602

    • W. R. Finnerty
    •  & M. E. Singer

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nbt0383-47

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