Review Article | Published:

The application of mass spectrometry to membrane proteomics

Nature Biotechnology volume 21, pages 262267 (2003) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Membrane proteins perform some of the most important functions in the cell, including the regulation of cell signaling through surface receptors, cell–cell interactions, and the intracellular compartmentalization of organelles. Recent developments in proteomic strategies have focused on the inclusion of membrane proteins in high-throughput analyses. While slow and steady progress continues to be made in gel-based technologies, significant advances have been reported in non-gel shotgun methods using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS). These latter strategies facilitate the identification of large numbers of membrane proteins and modifications, and have the potential to provide insights into protein topology and orientation in membranes.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Kathryn Howell and Mike MacCoss for providing insightful criticism for the manuscript. The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from the American Cancer Society PF-03-065-01-MGO (CCW) and the National Institutes of Health CA81665 and RR11823 (JRY).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Cell Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037

    • Christine C. Wu
    •  & John R. Yates III
  2. Department of Proteomics and Metabolomics, Torrey Mesa Research Institute, 3115 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121-1125.

    • John R. Yates III

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Correspondence to John R. Yates III.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nbt0303-262

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