Myoseverin, a microtubule-binding molecule with novel cellular effects

Abstract

A new microtubule-binding molecule, myoseverin, was identified from a library of 2,6,9-trisubstituted purines in a morphological differentiation screen. Myoseverin induces the reversible fission of multinucleated myotubes into mononucleated fragments. Myotube fission promotes DNA synthesis and cell proliferation after removal of the compound and transfer of the cells to fresh growth medium. Transcriptional profiling and biochemical analysis indicate that myoseverin alone does not reverse the biochemical differentiation process. Instead, myoseverin affects the expression of a variety of growth factor, immunomodulatory, extracellular matrix-remodeling, and stress response genes, consistent with the activation of pathways involved in wound healing and tissue regeneration.

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Figure 1: Myoseverin induces myotube fission.
Figure 2: Myoseverin disrupts the structure of the microtubule cytoskeleton.
Figure 3: (A) Biotinylated myoseverin affinity label.
Figure 4: Myoseverin facilitates cell cycle re-entry.

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Correspondence to Peter G. Schultz.

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