Genetic sequences: how are they patented?

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A survey reveals that the way in which genetic sequences are claimed in granted patents are heterogeneous and imprecise, which may lead to questions regarding their validity.

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Correspondence to Manuel Duval.

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Dufresne, G., Duval, M. Genetic sequences: how are they patented?. Nat Biotechnol 22, 231–232 (2004) doi:10.1038/nbt0204-231

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