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The licensing of DNA patents by US academic institutions: an empirical survey

A survey of technology transfer of DNA inventions at 19 top US research universities reveals consensus, diversity and flexibility in intellectual property management. Patent filing and license terms are influenced by intended uses of inventions, outside market interest and NIH guidelines.

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Figure 6: Percent of time there were competing interests at the time the license was signed.

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Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank the respondents at the 19 academic institutions that participated in this survey. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Human Genome Research Institute (grant no. 1 R03 HG02683) and the Department of Energy (grant no. DE-FG02-01ER63171) to Georgetown University (L.W.) and of both the National Human Genome Research Institute and the Department of Energy for a Centers of Excellence for Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Research grant (CEER grant no. P50 HG003391) to Duke University (R.M.C.-D.). We also thank our advisory board members for expert suggestions as we designed the survey instrument, Bi Ade for her capable research assistance and Marian Nella Daggett for her helpful comments on an earlier draft of this article.

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Correspondence to LeRoy Walters.

Supplementary information

Supplementary Fig. 1

Issue dates of patents characterized by license status compared with issue dates of all patents (DOC 219 kb)

Supplementary Fig. 2

Issue dates of patents in the main questionnaire compared with issue dates of all patents (DOC 224 kb)

Supplementary Table 1

Respondents’ comments on diligence and termination (DOC 32 kb)

Supplementary Table 2

Respondents’ replies when asked to describe reasons for license termination in the Main Questionnaire (DOC 20 kb)

Supplementary Methods (DOC 97 kb)

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Pressman, L., Burgess, R., Cook-Deegan, R. et al. The licensing of DNA patents by US academic institutions: an empirical survey. Nat Biotechnol 24, 31–39 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1038/nbt0106-31

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