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Ten ways in which He Jiankui violated ethics

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References

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Correspondence to Sheldon Krimsky.

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

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Krimsky, S. Ten ways in which He Jiankui violated ethics. Nat Biotechnol 37, 19–20 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1038/nbt.4337

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