Figure 4: Transmission rate of the dsxFCRISPRh driving allele and fecundity analysis of heterozygous male and female mosquitoes. | Nature Biotechnology

Figure 4: Transmission rate of the dsxFCRISPRh driving allele and fecundity analysis of heterozygous male and female mosquitoes.

From: A CRISPR–Cas9 gene drive targeting doublesex causes complete population suppression in caged Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

Figure 4

(ac) Male and female mosquitoes heterozygous for the dsxFCRISPRh allele (a) were analyzed in crosses with wild-type mosquitoes to assess the inheritance bias of the dsxFCRISPRh drive construct (b) and for the effect of the construct on their reproductive phenotype (c). (b) Scatter plot of the transgenic rate observed in the progeny of dsxFCRISPRh/+ female or male mosquitoes that gave progeny when crossed to wild-type individuals (n ≥ 33). Each dot represents the progeny derived from a single female. Both male and female dsxFCRISPRh/+ showed a high transmission rate of up to 100% of the dsxFCRISPRh allele to the progeny. The transmission rate was determined by visually scoring offspring for the RFP marker that is linked to the dsxFCRISPRh allele. The dotted line indicates the expected Mendelian inheritance. Mean transmission rate (± s.e.m.) is shown. (c) Scatter plot showing the number of larvae produced by single females (n ≥ 35) from crosses of dsxFCRISPRh/+ mosquitoes with wild-type individuals after one blood meal. Mean progeny count (± s.e.m.) is shown (****P < 0.0001; Kruskal–Wallis test).

Back to article page