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Secure cloud computing for genomic data

A Corrigendum to this article was published on 11 October 2016

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Figure 1: Security stack.

Change history

  • 11 August 2016

    In the version of this article initially published, the competing financial interests line should have been positive in the HTML as it was in the PDF (“The authors declare competing financial interests”). The statement “M.S. is a co-founder of Personalis and SensOmics and a member of the scientific advisory boards of Personalis, SensOmics and Genapsys” should also have appeared in the HTML. The errors have been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.

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Correspondence to Somalee Datta.

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Competing interests

M.S. is a co-founder of Personalis and SensOmics and a member of the scientific advisory boards of Personalis, SensOmics and Genapsys.

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Editor's note: This article has been peer reviewed.

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Datta, S., Bettinger, K. & Snyder, M. Secure cloud computing for genomic data. Nat Biotechnol 34, 588–591 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/nbt.3496

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