Patents | Published:

Does CRISPR-Cas open new possibilities for patents or present a moral maze?

Nature Biotechnology volume 32, pages 331333 (2014) | Download Citation

CRISPR-Cas systems, which enable the production of new artificial genes, synthetic proteins and new transgenic organisms, will challenge patent practices worldwide.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    et al. Science 337, 816–821 (2012).

  2. 2.

    et al. Nat. Biotechnol. 31, 233–239 (2013).

  3. 3.

    et al. Nat. Biotechnol. 31, 230–232 (2013).

  4. 4.

    et al. Nat. Biotechnol. 31, 227–229 (2013).

  5. 5.

    et al. Nat. Rev. Genet. 11, 636–646 (2010).

  6. 6.

    Association for Molecular Pathology et al. v. Myriad Genetics, Inc. et al. (13 June 2013).

  7. 7.

    Directive 98/44/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 July 1998 on the legal protection of biotechnological inventions, Official Journal L213, 0013–0021 (30 July 1998).

  8. 8.

    Diamond v. Chakrabarty, 447 US 303 (1980).

  9. 9.

    Patent no. 3, granted in Finland in 1843.

  10. 10.

    Plant Genetics Systems NV and Biogen, Inc. European Patent No. 0 242 236 (10 October 1990).

  11. 11.

    T0356/93 Plant cells/Plant Genetic Systems

  12. 12.

    T 0019/90 Onco-Mouse/Harvard .

  13. 13.

    Recital 16 of the Directive 98/44/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 July 1998 on the legal protection of biotechnological inventions, Official Journal L213, 0013–0021 (30 July 1998).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Philip Webber is at Dehns Patent and Trade Mark Attorneys, Oxford, UK.

    • Philip Webber

Authors

  1. Search for Philip Webber in:

Competing interests

The author declares no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Philip Webber.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nbt.2843

Further reading

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing