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Ecology

A global plan for nature conservation

Nature volume 550, pages 4849 (05 October 2017) | Download Citation

An international movement is calling for at least half of the Earth to be allocated for conservation. A global study now reveals that, in many ecoregions, enough habitat exists to reach this goal, and ideas are proposed for the next steps needed.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. James E. M. Watson is at the Wildlife Conservation Society and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia.

    • James E. M. Watson
  2. Oscar Venter is in the Natural Resources and Environmental Studies Institute, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George V2N 2M7, Canada.

    • Oscar Venter

Authors

  1. Search for James E. M. Watson in:

  2. Search for Oscar Venter in:

Corresponding author

Correspondence to James E. M. Watson.

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Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nature24144

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