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Mapping of a non-spatial dimension by the hippocampal–entorhinal circuit

Nature volume 543, pages 719722 (30 March 2017) | Download Citation

Abstract

During spatial navigation, neural activity in the hippocampus and the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) is correlated to navigational variables such as location1,2, head direction3, speed4, and proximity to boundaries5. These activity patterns are thought to provide a map-like representation of physical space. However, the hippocampal–entorhinal circuit is involved not only in spatial navigation, but also in a variety of memory-guided behaviours6. The relationship between this general function and the specialized spatial activity patterns is unclear. A conceptual framework reconciling these views is that spatial representation is just one example of a more general mechanism for encoding continuous, task-relevant variables7,8,9,10. Here we tested this idea by recording from hippocampal and entorhinal neurons during a task that required rats to use a joystick to manipulate sound along a continuous frequency axis. We found neural representation of the entire behavioural task, including activity that formed discrete firing fields at particular sound frequencies. Neurons involved in this representation overlapped with the known spatial cell types in the circuit, such as place cells and grid cells. These results suggest that common circuit mechanisms in the hippocampal–entorhinal system are used to represent diverse behavioural tasks, possibly supporting cognitive processes beyond spatial navigation.

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Acknowledgements

We thank A. Akrami, C. Constantinople, C. Domnisoru, J. Gauthier, A. Miri, K. Rajan, D. Rich, and B. Scott for suggestions, as well as S. Lowe for assistance with machining. The illustrations in Fig. 1a are by J. Kuhl. This work was supported by the Simons Foundation, NIH Grant 1K99NS093071 (D.A.) and the US Federal Work-Study program (R.N.).

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Affiliations

  1. Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA

    • Dmitriy Aronov
    • , Rhino Nevers
    •  & David W. Tank

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Contributions

D.A. and. D.W.T designed the experiments. D.A. and R.N. performed the experiments and analysed the data. D.A., R.N. and D.W.T. wrote the paper.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Dmitriy Aronov or David W. Tank.

Reviewer Information Nature thanks E. Buffalo, M. Mehta and the other anonymous reviewer(s) for their contribution to the peer review of this work.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nature21692

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