News & Views | Published:

Biomedicine

An eye on retinal recovery

Nature volume 540, pages 350351 (15 December 2016) | Download Citation

Retinal-cell transplants restore vision in mouse models of retinal degeneration. It emerges that the transplant leads to an exchange of material between donor and host cells — not to donor-cell integration into the retina, as had been presumed.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    et al. Nature 444, 203–207 (2006).

  2. 2.

    et al. Nature 485, 99–103 (2012).

  3. 3.

    et al. Nature Commun. (2016).

  4. 4.

    et al. Nature Commun. 7, 13028 (2016).

  5. 5.

    et al. Nature Commun. 7, 13029 (2016).

  6. 6.

    , , & Nature Cell Biol. 5, 959–966 (2003).

  7. 7.

    et al. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 106, 6685–6690 (2009).

  8. 8.

    et al. Nature 472, 51–56 (2011).

  9. 9.

    et al. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 106, 16698–16703 (2009).

  10. 10.

    et al. Cell Stem Cell 17, 101–115 (2015).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Michael A. Dyer is in the Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. He is also in the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

    • Michael A. Dyer

Authors

  1. Search for Michael A. Dyer in:

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Michael A. Dyer.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nature20487

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing