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Evolution

Gene transfer in complex cells

Nature volume 524, pages 423424 (27 August 2015) | Download Citation

A comparative genomic study shows that, during evolution, nucleus-containing cells acquired DNA from bacteria primarily by endosymbiosis — the uptake and integration of one cell by another. See Article p.427

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. John M. Archibald is in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2, Canada, and at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Program in Integrated Microbial Biodiversity, Toronto.

    • John M. Archibald

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Correspondence to John M. Archibald.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nature15205

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