Review Article | Published:

Metabolism of stromal and immune cells in health and disease

Nature volume 511, pages 167176 (10 July 2014) | Download Citation

Abstract

Cancer cells have been at the centre of cell metabolism research, but the metabolism of stromal and immune cells has received less attention. Nonetheless, these cells influence the progression of malignant, inflammatory and metabolic disorders. Here we discuss the metabolic adaptations of stromal and immune cells in health and disease, and highlight how metabolism determines their differentiation and function.

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Acknowledgements

Supporting fellowships: FWO Fellowships (B.G., B.W.W., A.K.) and Marie Curie Fellowship (B.W.W.). Supporting grants: IUAP P7/03, long-term structural funding - Methusalem funding by the Flemish Government, FWO grants, AXA Research Fund and ERC Advanced Research Grant. We thank P. Agostinis, M. Baes, K. De Bock, S. Fendt, P. Fraisl, B. Lambrecht, A. Liston, M. Mazzone, J. Rathmell, J. Van Ginderachter, P. Verstreken and others for suggestions.

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  1. Laboratory of Angiogenesis and Neurovascular Link, Vesalius Research Center, Department of Oncology, University of Leuven, Leuven B-3000, Belgium

    • Bart Ghesquière
    • , Brian W. Wong
    • , Anna Kuchnio
    •  & Peter Carmeliet
  2. Laboratory of Angiogenesis and Neurovascular Link, Vesalius Research Center, VIB, Leuven B-3000, Belgium

    • Bart Ghesquière
    • , Brian W. Wong
    • , Anna Kuchnio
    •  & Peter Carmeliet

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All authors contributed to the writing of this manuscript.

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Peter Carmeliet.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nature13312

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