The multilayered complexity of ceRNA crosstalk and competition

Abstract

Recent reports have described an intricate interplay among diverse RNA species, including protein-coding messenger RNAs and non-coding RNAs such as long non-coding RNAs, pseudogenes and circular RNAs. These RNA transcripts act as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) or natural microRNA sponges — they communicate with and co-regulate each other by competing for binding to shared microRNAs, a family of small non-coding RNAs that are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Understanding this novel RNA crosstalk will lead to significant insight into gene regulatory networks and have implications in human development and disease.

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Figure 1: PTEN competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) network.
Figure 2: Variable factors that may influence competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) effectiveness.

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Acknowledgements

We thank S. M. Tan, R. Taulli, F. Karreth and other members of the Pandolfi laboratory for helpful discussions and critical review of the manuscript. Y.T. received a Special Fellow Award from The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. P.P.P. was supported by US National Institutes of Health grant R01 CA-82328.

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Correspondence to Pier Paolo Pandolfi.

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Tay, Y., Rinn, J. & Pandolfi, P. The multilayered complexity of ceRNA crosstalk and competition. Nature 505, 344–352 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1038/nature12986

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