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The bone marrow niche for haematopoietic stem cells

Nature volume 505, pages 327334 (16 January 2014) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Niches are local tissue microenvironments that maintain and regulate stem cells. Haematopoiesis provides a model for understanding mammalian stem cells and their niches, but the haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche remains incompletely defined and beset by competing models. Recent progress has been made in elucidating the location and cellular components of the HSC niche in the bone marrow. The niche is perivascular, created partly by mesenchymal stromal cells and endothelial cells and often, but not always, located near trabecular bone. Outstanding questions concern the cellular complexity of the niche, the role of the endosteum and functional heterogeneity among perivascular microenvironments.

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Acknowledgements

S.J.M. was supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (HL097760), the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and the Mary McDermott Cook Chair in Pediatric Genetics. D.T.S. was supported by the National Institutes of Health (HL044851, HL096372, EB014703) and the Gerald and Darlene Jordan Chair in Medicine. We apologize to authors whose work could not be cited because of space limitations.

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  1. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Children's Research Institute, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA.

    • Sean J. Morrison
  2. Center for Regenerative Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Stem Cell Institute and the Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.

    • David T. Scadden

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Correspondence to Sean J. Morrison or David T. Scadden.

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