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Neuroscience

Genes and human brain evolution

Nature volume 486, pages 481482 (28 June 2012) | Download Citation

Several genes were duplicated during human evolution. It seems that one such duplication gave rise to a gene that may have helped to make human brains bigger and more adaptable than those of our ancestors.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Daniel H. Geschwind is in the Department of Neurology and the Semel Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-1761, USA.

    • Daniel H. Geschwind
  2. Genevieve Konopka is in the Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390-9111, USA.

    • Genevieve Konopka

Authors

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Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Daniel H. Geschwind or Genevieve Konopka.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nature11380

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