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Nanometre-scale electronics with III–V compound semiconductors

Abstract

For 50 years the exponential rise in the power of electronics has been fuelled by an increase in the density of silicon complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) transistors and improvements to their logic performance. But silicon transistor scaling is now reaching its limits, threatening to end the microelectronics revolution. Attention is turning to a family of materials that is well placed to address this problem: group III–V compound semiconductors. The outstanding electron transport properties of these materials might be central to the development of the first nanometre-scale logic transistors.

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Figure 1: Electron and hole mobility of group III–V compound semiconductors.
Figure 2: Electron injection velocity in III–V HEMTs.
Figure 3: High 'on' currents in III–V HEMTs.
Figure 4: Possible future MOSFETs using a III–V compound semiconductor channel.

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Acknowledgements

I have enjoyed stimulating discussions with students, collaborators and colleagues. I am particularly thankful to D. Antoniadis, R. Chau, S. Datta, J. Hoyt, D. Jin, D.-H. Kim, T.-W. Kim, A. Kummel, J. Lin, M. Lundstrom, S. Oktyabrsky, M. Passlack, M. Radosavljevic, E. Vogel, N. Waldron, R. Wallace, L. Xia and P. Ye. Research on III–V CMOS transistors at my lab at MIT has been funded by the Materials, Structures and Devices FCRP Center and Intel Corporation.

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del Alamo, J. Nanometre-scale electronics with III–V compound semiconductors. Nature 479, 317–323 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10677

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