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Huang et al. reply

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Replying to F. M. Richter Nature 472, 10.1038/nature09954 (2011)

In our Letter1, we showed that the phenomenon of isotope fractionation in silicate melts by thermal diffusion, first reported in 1998 (ref. 2), can be characterised by a parameter ΔST that is independent of temperature and composition. (Here ΔST is the difference in the Soret coefficient, ST, between isotopes of a diffusing element.) Richter3 questioned this finding by plotting Mg isotope ratio versus temperature data (figure 1 in ref. 3) for a subset of experiments from figure 3f of ref. 1.

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Figure 1: Variation of Mg and Fe isotope data with composition and temperature.

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Correspondence to F. Huang.

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Huang, F., Chakraborty, P., Lundstrom, C. et al. Huang et al. reply. Nature 472, E2–E3 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1038/nature09955

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